Month: January 2018

Making Healthy Living Easy & Affordable for Everyone w/ Gunnar Lovelace— 298

Gunnar Lovelace is founder and Co-CEO at Thrive Market, an online wholesale-buying club committed to sustainability and social justice. Lovelace is a is a lifelong health advocate and serial entrepreneur. He grew up as a child of a single mother, and experienced first hand how hard it was for families on fixed budgets to make healthy choices. At Thrive Market, he and his partners are on a mission to make healthy living accessible and affordable to everyone.

In this episode, we dive into how Thrive Market built their business, what strategies they use to offer high quality foods to underserved markets, why we need more supplements than ever before, the new regenerative organic certification, and more. Enjoy!

Special bonus: Tune in to the very beginning of the video podcast on YouTube to watch a 10 minute guided tour of Thrive Market’s headquarters by Gunnar Lovelace.

Special offer: Click here to get $60 of FREE Organic Grocery Credits and FREE shipping for as many orders as you want for 30 days.


Accessible and affordable high quality food

Thrive Model built a unique membership model that allows them to deliver high quality organic, non-GMO foods throughout the nation. Their model is based on cutting a lot of middlemen from the supply chain of traditional retailers, such as, co-packers, brands, brokers, distributors, retailers, and more. That allows them to sell food to a wide audience without additional markups. Thrive Market is sort of an online Costco, full of only healthy, high quality products.

“At the core of Thrive Market, we sell organic and non-GMO groceries at the same price as conventional equivalence for the first time in history, shipped to your home for free, in eco-friendly packaging.” — Gunnar Lovelace


Key Takeaways

  • Focusing on underserved markets — 50% of Thrive Market customers are located in the midwest and the south (in the USA). Coastal states and cities have better accessibility to high quality foods, but Thrive Market figured out how to serve markets with very little to no access. Most likely, no matter where you are in the states, you can get high quality foods in your hometown. 
  • “Content is marketing and marketing is content.”—Thrive Market is highly focused on their brand. In a time where people don’t trust their traditional food sources, Thrive Market is strict on adhering to their values. They choose very carefully the brands they work with and make sure to protect the trust they built with their customers.
  • Growing a food retailer business — Thrive Market focused on a growth strategy, and lost a lot of money on every sale in the beginning, knowing eventually they’ll hit the scale needed to become profitable. Although Lovelace and his partners got rejected by every VC around the nation, it ended up being a blessing. They raised $10 million from 150 mega-bloggers, which also helped with organic marketing.
  • We need more supplements now because traditional foods are being mishandled — 100 years ago everybody ate organic whole foods. But now the norm is to eat chemically sprayed produce and malnutritioned animal products, which is why we need more supplements to balance our health.
  • Regenerative Organic Certification — There is a new, higher bar, organic label in the works called the Regenerative Organic Certification. This new label is focused on enriching the soil, while valuing people and animals. When we grow food on dead soil with chemical fertilizers grows, it creates empty calorie produce. The new certification process will increase responsibility and make for a better, healthier planet.
  • Thrive Market is the largest food retailer that sells exclusively non-GMO groceries — GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) are in almost everything these days, which is not necessarily bad, but it can get bad. When GMOs are made in large scale, it is usually done with massive amounts of poison, which our foods might be able to withstand it, but also absorb, and it’s not healthy for humans or the planet. Thrive Market isn’t against GMO, they just think it needs to be done more slowly and properly.
  • Thoughtful partnerships — Lovelace and his business partners travel to check out food retailers and growers themselves. They like to get to know the business owners well and see the operations in-person, making sure they bring the highest quality foods and ingredients into Thrive Market.
  • Recommended apps to scan products for health evaluation — EWG’s Healthy Living and Thrive Market (an award winning app).

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Connect with Gunnar Lovelace

Connect on social: Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter

Resources: Thrive Market, Thrive Market Instagram

Special offer: Click here to get $60 of FREE Organic Grocery Credits and FREE shipping for as many orders as you want for 30 days.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

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Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post Making Healthy Living Easy & Affordable for Everyone w/ Gunnar Lovelace— 298 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

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Glutes, glutes, and more glutes w/ Bret Contreras “The Glute Guy” — 297

Bret Contreras has become known in the strength and conditioning industry as the Glute Guy because of his expertise in helping clients develop strong, shapely glutes. In 2015, he earned his PhD in sport science from the Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand, where he studied under biomechanics expert John Cronin. Contreras has conducted numerous electromyography experiments in his research.

As the former owner of Lifts Studio in Scottsdale, Arizona, Contreras worked closely with hundreds of clients ranging from sedentary people to elite athletes, and he invented a glute-strengthening machine called the Hip Thruster. He currently trains figure competitors, writes programs for clients from all over the world, and consults for various professional sport teams. He is the author of the bestselling book Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy and co-author of Strong Curves: A Woman’s Guide to Building a Better Butt and Body.

Contreras is a distinguished lecturer in strength and conditioning, presenting at many conferences throughout the world, including those hosted by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). He is the cofounder of Strength & Conditioning Research Review and founder of Strong by Bret. He is a peer-reviewed author with over 40 published studies and regular contributor to well-known industry publications including Men’s Health, Men’s Fitness, Flex, Muscle & Fitness, Oxygen, Shape, and FitnessRX for Women. Oxygen magazine voted him the Glute Expert in their 2010 Glutes edition and Men’s Health listed his “Glute Lab” as a Top 20 Gym in the United States in 2016.

In this episode, we dive into glute development exercises, functional vs body-part split training, the hip thrust, horizontal and vertical resistance training, and more.


Glutes obsession

Bret Contreras has been obsessed with glutes for over 20 years. He started working out as a kid because he didn’t want to get bullied, and he wanted to get girls. When he realized girls were into guys with good looking butts and his was non-existent, he started obsessing on glutes. Contreras read every strength and conditioning magazine trying to figure out how to build bigger, stronger glutes. He even got his PhD in Sports Science in 2015 just to be able to answer his own questions, conducting his own research appropriately. Contreras never had intentions on becoming a research professor, he’s just glutes obsessed. 🍑

“You have to rely on anecdotes. That’s why coaches talk to other coaches and why athletes talk to other athletes. You don’t just go by research, research is important, but I’m so sick of coaches that don’t respect researchers, and researchers that don’t respect anecdotes. They’re both wrong. We have knowledge out there and we can gain it through a lot of ways.” — Bret Contreras


Key Takeaways

  • Lifting light weights can build big muscles as lifting heavy weights —  Contreras learned through anecdotes and his own experiments that light weights can help build big butts. The same concept doesn’t apply to strength though, you need heavy weights to get stronger (for more info on building muscle check out episode 289 with Brad Schoenfeld).
  • Glute development exercises — Contreras is the inventor of the hip thruster, which is his favorite glute development exercise. His programs always include at least 2 of 3 of:
  • Front to back resistance — Horizontal/anteroposterior movements such as hip thrusts, reverse hyper, romanian deadlifts and walking lunges.
  • Up down resistance — Vertical movements such as squats, lunges
  • Rotational resistance — Lateral rotation exercises such as standing cable hip abduction and bent over hip abduction.
  • Ground Force 360 — Contreras’ favorite rotational exercises machine is not available for commercial use yet. It’s a clinical lab machine only for now, called Ground Force 360, which stimulates and stabilizes the body’s inner rotational axis.
  • Functional vs body-part split training—Functional training is much more trendy now, and only split-body training is not great, but it has its benefits. Contreras likes a mix of functional and body-part split training best. He gives his athletes 10 minutes at the end of every workout to add whatever they like, knowing it’s not enough time to destroy themselves. He also avoids too much tricep or bicep work, which can the joints achy.
  • Train your glutes 3 days a week! — Contreras recommends you train your glutes 3 days a week, which is a concept he received from Nathalia Melo, a Brazilian bikini athlete, who won 2012 Olympia Ms. Bikini.
  • Glute work for crossfitters—Since crossfit athletes already have a huge load of workouts on their plate, Contreras recommends incorporating specifically these few exercises for glute development: Glute bridges, hip thrusts, frog jumps, and back extensions. He even a wrote an article called Who Thinks CrossFit Needs A Glute WoD?
  • Different curves and range of motion —  Every exercise has a purpose. Recent studies showed that hip thrusts help improve acceleration, and front squats help improve vertical jump. They also showed heavy hip thrusts alone didn’t improve sprinting performance.
  • Don’t push too hard— Contreras doesn’t push his athletes too hard with heavy weights, he goes by feel, making sure his athletes get a good feel and control of their muscles and movements.

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Connect with Bret Contreras

Connect on social: Instagram, Facebook

Resources: The Glute Guy, Hip Thruster, 2 x 4: Maximum Strength




Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com


Watch the show

PART I

PART II


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

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Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post Glutes, glutes, and more glutes w/ Bret Contreras “The Glute Guy” — 297 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Mobility, Stability and Strength w/ Dr. Jordan Jiunta and Dr. Jordan Shallow — 296

Dr. Jordan Jiunta and Dr. Jordan Shallow are co-founders of Pre-Script, co-hosts of RX’D RADIO, chiropractors, and competitive athletes. Jiunta competes in CrossFit and Olympic Weightlifting, and is a CrossFit Level 1 trainer. Shallow competes in Powerlifting and also coaches strength and conditioning at Stanford University Rugby Team.

Jiunta understands the importance of learning and training our bodies natural movement patterns to not only prevent injury, but to live a higher quality life as well. Shallow’s patients range from world-class athletes to 9–5 weekend warriors, and he understands the needs of each individual paired with the demand of their lifestyle.

In this episode, we dive into why and how they created Pre-Script, a service dedicated to helping its members move better, and perform at their best. We cover how they assess athletes, why stability is misunderstood, why scaled stimulus is more than resistance, and more.


Mobility, Stability and Strength

Both Jiunta and Shallow have suffered from sports injuries in the past, learned how to overcome them, and are now stronger than ever, competing and getting PRs. They created Pre-Script, a service dedicated to helping its members move better, and perform at their best. Being an athlete-chiropractor mix is what helps both Jordans come up with their injury rehab and prevention programs, and why they can relate to their clients.

Pre-Script’s programs are used in over 15 countries and are focused on Mobility, Stability and Strength model. Their premise is that if we’re lifting, then we’re creating forces through our joints, and Pre-Script is meant to reinforce the better way to do movement. Their model is built on freeing up the full range of motion, followed by lightweight/bodyweight drills to stabilize that range of motion, and once you gain control, add strength.

“Whether it’s introductory corrective exercise programs for beginner lifters or a personalized Pre-Script program for a more tailored approach, Pre-Script prides itself on fitting the needs of the athlete with the demands of their sport. Allowing each member to pursue to their passion to their highest potential.”


Key Takeaways

  • When you train under load, you make structural changes — Training under load is what makes the body adapt, as it allows the body to recover when we’re not under load.
  • Stability is misunderstood — If you are missing stability, then you are more likely to get injured. Loading unstable muscles is what causes injuries. You need to be loading muscles both anatomically and neurologically, doing a range of stability drills.
  • Assessing weaknesses — Jiunta and Shallow look first at shoulders and hamstrings, as those muscles have the most freedom of movement. Jiunta is the more acute assessor, and likes to start with a bodyweight squat. If that looks good, he moves onto an overhead squat, which reveals most weaknesses. Shallow likes to assess athletes using an overhead press, one leg hinges and rotation drills.
  • The conversation between the brain and the body —The body will always find ways to get stable, and will trade structure for function.
  • Using resistance to progress the stimulus of instability — Jiunta and Shallow like unilateral movements for stability. Their favorite exercises include, single leg RDLs, kettlebell bottom-up presses, and bulgarian split squats. They like to lean more into the unstable, for example: using only one dumbell instead of two for bulgarian squats.
  • Scaled stimulus is more than resistance — Range of motion is more important than weight. You need to understand the input and gauge for output. When something is out of whack or injured, you can’t ignore those muscles, you need to regress into very low intensity movements, and slowly increase intensity and volume. That will help you recover correctly.
  • If you can’t do one leg movements — You can still get unilateral stability with both of your legs on the ground. For example do: Lateral lunges, walking lunges, even stationary lunges, and loaded step-ups are really great for creating stability.
  • If you can’t overhead squat—Don’t try to perform the movement until you are good at it. Load stability drills in the best range of motion as you can, and slowly move into full range of motion. For example do: Overhead walks and front rack lunges, slowly creating better patterns.

“Stability is the body’s capability to resist force, and strength is the body’s capability to exert force.” — Jordan Shallow

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Connect with Dr. Jordan Jiunta

Connect on social: Instagram

Resources: Pre-Script, RX’D RADIO on iTunes, Pre-Script Instagram, RX’D Radio Instagram


Connect with Dr. Jordan Shallow

Connect on social: Instagram

Resources: Pre-Script, RX’D RADIO on iTunes, The Muscle Doc Seminars, Pre-Script Instagram, RX’D Radio Instagram


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

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Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post Mobility, Stability and Strength w/ Dr. Jordan Jiunta and Dr. Jordan Shallow — 296 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

The Next Great American Weightlifter—Harrison Maurus — 295

Harrison Maurus is a 17 year old weightlifting prodigy and world champion. Last year, Maurus not only won the 2017 Youth World Championships in Bangkok, Thailand, but also set a new Clean & Jerk Youth World Record of 192kg at the men’s 77kg group.

Maurus squatted 200kg at age 13, over 3x bodyweight, and just a month ago, earned a bronze medal in both the men’s 77 kg total and clean & jerk at the 2017 IWF Weightlifting World Championships in Anaheim, CA, securing Team USA’s first men’s weightlifting world medals in 20 years.

In this episode, we dive into Maurus’ path in the weightlifting world, his special relationship with his coach Kevin Simons (a CrossFit Games competitor), and his programming and coaching.


Talent, coaching, and hard work.

Harrison Maurus met his coach Kevin Simons (two time CrossFit Games competitor) as his gymnastics coach when he was 10 years old. When Maurus was looking for a change from gymnastics, coach Simons introduced him to Powerlifting so he could get strong. Maurus had an amazing talent and strength at a very young age, and broke all national records around when he was 12 years old. He squatted 100kg when he was 11, 150 kg when he was 12, and 200kg (over 3x bodyweight, weighing 65kg) when he was 13!!!

Watch Maurus breaking national records lifting 200kg, over 3x bodyweight, at age 13!


Key Takeaways

  • You don’t need a weightlifting background — Coach Simons didn’t have a background in weightlifting, but because his student, Maurus, was so good, he dived deep into the science and created very detailed and specific programs for him that prioritize longevity and health.
  • The champion mostly holds back — Maurus only missed 5 total lifts in the past 12 weeks! Which was one “weird” jerk and four PR snatches attempts. Maurus doesn’t get pushed to lift very heavy often to keep healthy, build confidence, and because competitions don’t leave much room for error with 3 attempts only for each lift.
  • How you feel matters — When Maurus walks into the gym with a smile, coach Simons pushes him for upper percentage work. When Maurus isn’t feeling it, coach Simons keeps him at the lower end of percentages. Going by feel helps keep the ball rolling both physically and emotionally.
  • 2020 Olympics aspirations — Maurus dedicates all of his time to weightlifting and set his intentions to represent the USA at the 2020 Olympics. He intends on competing for as long as possible and aspires to compete at several Olympic Games.
  • Jumping a weight class — Maurus intends to jump one weight class to 85kg. He wants to get stronger and lift even more weights! Coach Simons planned big hypertrophy blocks for him: “Lots of sets and lots of volume.”
  • Maurus only goes hard twice a year at two big meets — It’s all about longevity when it comes to Maurus’ training. He only goes out big twice, because lifting so much weights is hard on the body.
  • Vary your training — Maurus’ training includes elements from Powerlifting, Strongman and CrossFit. He does yoke, farmer and suitcase carries, rope pulls, sled work, and more.

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Connect with Harrison Maurus

Connect on social: Instagram

Resources: TeamAlphaSC Instagram


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post The Next Great American Weightlifter—Harrison Maurus — 295 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Supplements for Optimizing Your Health—Drew Canole— 294

Drew Canole is nutrition specialist, transformation specialist and national spokesperson for the benefits of juicing vegetables for health and vitality. He is the founder and CEO of Fitlife.TV, where he shares educational, inspirational and entertaining videos and articles about health, fitness, healing and longevity. Drew is also a best selling author and the founder of Organifi, an organic, incredibly delicious greens powder, chock-full of superfoods to make juicing easy no matter your busy schedule.

Special offer: Use promo code: “SHRUGGED” for 20% OFF at Organifi.


Juicing daily, eating clean and working out smarter

Drew Canole went from being an overweight guy, who liked to consume a bunch of food and energy drinks regularly, including alcohol every weekend, to a rockstar in the world of fitness, nutrition and mindset, with a huge heart to help others and transform the world.

Drew used lived in Tampa, FL, where most of his environment led a similar unhealthy lifestyle, which he wanted to break from. He was introduced to juicing by a friend, and decided to give a try as well. Drew went all in on making healthy choices, he began juicing daily, eating clean and working out smarter, and lost 40 lb. in 90 days!

After experiencing his own success, Drew was inspired to start a movement that can inspire others. It all started with a dream, in which he was dying! 💀 The day after, when Drew woke up, made a switch, and ever since has been relentless about helping people. He also moved to San Diego, CA to be surrounded by like-minded people who can support his big vision.

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Key Takeaways

  • Turmeric — A plant that is good for fighting inflammation, and can improve your mood and overall feeling.
  • Ashwagandha — An adaptogen that doesn’t taste good, but helps with testosterone, mental clarity and stress.
  • Chlorella — One of the best plant based fat sources on the planet. helps detox heavy metals from the body.
  • Spirulina — Greatest form of B12 on the planet, helps with stem cell regeneration.
  • Lemon balm magnesium — Helps the body relax.
  • Medicinal mushrooms — Cordyceps, reishi, and turkey tail mushrooms are good for your immune system, longevity, and muscle relaxation.
  • Lion’s Mane mushrooms — Good to take before bed for improving the immune system, memory support, and having more vivid dreams.
  • The more vividly you remember your dreams, the healthier you are — remembering your dreams is associated with your overall health. If you don’t dream or can’t remember your dreams too well, it might be a sign that you need to improve your health.
  • Transforming strangers is easier than transforming people who are close to you — If you’re trying to transform people’s lives, you’re better off trying to influence people that are not family or close friends. Those will be the last people to get influenced by your extraordinary ideas. That’s just how relationship dynamics go. People that are not so close to you, are more open to take advice and get transformed by you.

“Changing a cheat meal to a treat meal changed everything.” — Drew Canole






Connect with Drew Canole

Connect on social: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter

Resources: DrewCanole.com, Fitlife.TV, Organifi (use promo code: “SHRUGGED” for 20% OFF)


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post Supplements for Optimizing Your Health—Drew Canole— 294 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.