Month: February 2018

Coaching is Coaching is Coaching w/ Shane Farmer — 302

Shane Farmer is a rowing specialist, a coach, an entrepreneur, a 4-time CrossFit Games athlete, and the founder of Dark Horse Rowing and Dark Horse Academy.

Farmer is known in the CrossFit community as a rowing specialist who has worked with elite CrossFit Games athletes, including 2017 CrossFit Games champion Clair Toomey, Kari Pearce, Lauren Fisher, Garrett Fisher, Sam Dancer, and others.

In this episode, we dive into how to develop your coaching experience and philosophy, how to allow yourself to grow as a coach, shifting your paradigm, and more. Enjoy!

Fun Fact: Shane Farmer worked with our friend Drew Canole (episode 294) on FitLife.TV back in 2011. Here is a taste:


The Art of Coaching

Shane Farmer fell in love with rowing in college and has been surrounding himself with top notch coaches ever since. He always wanted to learn more and make a big impact. That’s how he became a rowing specialist and master coach.

Farmer went from giving people rowing advice at the gym, to coaching one-on-one, to coaching small groups, to recording and sharing YouTube videos, to running seminars, to now running Dark Horse Academy, which is an online seminar for coaches on how to train their clients with Farmer’s rowing methodologies.

Farmer became a great coach because he has been open-minded and attuned to his clients over the years. He became an effective coach by looking for physical cues, feeling the energy, and assessing how his clients feel. He learned to adapt to situations and translate the messages in his head to appeal to a wide audience. Today, he teaches other teachers his coaching philosophies.

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Key Takeaways

  • What to do when your athletes don’t care about rowing — Farmer has been working with the crossfit community for the past few years, he discovered the best way to get athletes excited about rowing is to relate it to other crossfit movement, such as kettlebell swings, snatches, and deadlifts.
  • How to develop your coaching experience and philosophy — As a coach you need to start by learning from others, then apply what you’ve learned on yourself, then coach one client, then five, then ten, etc. You need to gradually own the content you’ve learned and figure out how to deliver value. If you don’t have real clients to experiment with, start by coaching your spouse or kids.
  • Allowing yourself to grow as a coach — Being a coach is more than teaching the movements and how to breathe. Coaching becomes an emotional exploration with your clients, which is more than movement expression. Clients usually want be around their coaches for other purposes whether it’s lifestyle or their physical energy. As a coach you need to make space for growth and allow yourself to grow. Listen to verbal cues, feel the energy in the gym, and talk to your clients.
  • How to grow from an instructor to a coach — You need to be able to internalize things, learn from them, and change as you grow. Understanding why you’re what you’re doing takes knowledge and experience. It usually takes around 10 years to really understand what you’re doing as a coach.
  • You need to have humility to learn — The best athletes and coaches don’t see themselves as good enough and have always have a desire to learn and grow. They don’t care about looking like a beginner or being one.
  • Shifting your paradigm — In rowing, you need to be able to connect to the machine. It’s not about speeding up or systemic speed, or just moving faster yourself. You need to apply the right force to the handle, which measures force, acceleration and distance. When it comes to rowing, Farmer likes to teach the concept of changing the paradigm from pulling to pushing.
  • How to learn rowing basics — Start by focusing on good static positions, then perform the movement very slow, hitting all the good positions.

Connect with Shane Farmer

Connect on social: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook

Resources: Shane Farmer, Dark Horse Rowing, Dark Horse Rowing YouTube


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com


Movement-RX

If you have low back, knee, or shoulder pain, check out Movement-Rx. Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner will get you healthy and strong.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike, Doug and Anders

The post Coaching is Coaching is Coaching w/ Shane Farmer — 302 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

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The Shoulder Fix: Eliminating Shoulder Pain in the Strength Athlete

Shoulder Suicide

You aren’t lifting weights just to burn off calories or aggression. The gym is your sanctuary to test yourself, find your upper limits, create goals, and smash them.

The barbell has a simple way of calibrating input to test human output. You put ten pounds on the bar and your body must adapt. Incrementally, those adaptations lead to increased strength, PR’s, and, unfortunately, nagging injuries.

Over 80% of the movements found in functional fitness gyms use the shoulder joint. It is the most mobile and vulnerable joint in the body. Every time you snatch, jerk, push, pull, and swing, your shoulder is being put through a massive range of motion, under heavy load, at high intensity.

The shoulder comes with extreme complexity. The large movers of the upper body — the traps, rhomboids, teres major, pec, and rotator cuff — attach at the neck, spine, and shoulder blade. Their primary role is to create stability in the shoulder, scapula, and spine. To protect the shoulder, these muscles must be strong to handle external load, mobile to hit end ranges of motion, and stable to control movement throughout these ranges.

Strength, mobility, and stability are the result of deep core musculature protecting the spine. Lacking balance in any of these domains places excess demand on the rotator cuff leading to chronic pain and injury. Your responsibility as an athlete is to protect the joint and arm yourself with the tools to keep it healthy.


A Movement Laboratory

I never want athletes to be injured, however, it happens. When it happens, it presents a transition point, an opportunity.

The short-term solution is to bear down, push through the pain, and keep charging.

The second, smarter option is to recognize injury as an opportunity to learn. A moment to dissect your movement patterns, slow down, and refocus your energy towards getting healthy.

It is obvious the gym is a place to develop strength. More importantly, it is a laboratory for human movement. A place to assess the capabilities of your joints, tissues, and movement patterns across an array of tests.

Shoulder extension vs. shoulder flexion issues

  • Does your shoulder hurt in the bottom of a muscle up, dip, or push up? The silver lining is you get to learn about improving shoulder extension.
  • When you snatch, jerk, or press overhead, do you feel pain? If so, time to dig into understanding shoulder flexion and external rotation.

Just like any laboratory setting, there are unexpected “a-ha” moments. One of your first “a-ha” moments is that shoulder pain is a symptom of poor core strength and stability. Once you learn how to breathe and stabilize your spine you will learn you do not actually have a shoulder problem. A-ha!

A post shared by Anders Varner (@andersvarner) on


How Are Your Shoulders? Screening Shoulder Extension

The perfect push up position

  1. Start in a standing position, with your palm forward, and pull your arms in a straight line behind your body. In this extended position, bend at the elbow bringing your hands in line with your chest. Without the weight of your body, this is the bottom position of the perfect push up. The elbows are in to your side, the shoulder is internally rotated, and your hand is directly under the shoulder.
  2. Be honest with yourself. Do all of your push-ups look like this?

While the push-up seems so simple, it is the baseline movement screen for understanding shoulder extension and internal rotation. Too often, as you speed through your push ups, your elbows start to flare out. As the elbows drift away from the body, the shoulder has to compensate. This internally rotated position lacks stability and applies excess pressure to the front of the shoulder.   You want large joints and muscles carrying the bulk of the load. In the upper body the chain of events follows the shoulder, then elbow, and finally the wrist. To ensure these movement principles are met, the first movement of the push up is not down, it is forward. The chest moves forward to load the shoulders, then the body can descend by driving the elbows back, and slowly lowering the chest to the ground.

Shoulder Extension Movement Exercise

DO THIS: With the ‘big joint to small joint’ principle in mind, place a PVC pipe on your back, maintaining three points of contact (head, back, and butt) perform 5 push-ups each with a 5 second descent. Are you pain free?

The principle of shoulder extension is universal, but the expression of this principle can take many shapes. Let’s apply the same principle to other movements:

Dip — A dip requires the same shoulder extension, but increases difficulty because your bodyweight is not supported by your feet

Muscle Up — The muscle up challenges this position through an athletic, dynamic movement that requires you to catch the weight instead of slowly lower into a good position.

Shoulder Extension Self-Assessment

To see if your shoulders are functional enough to perform these movements well over many reps, try this self-assessment: Can you reach up your arm behind you to touch the bottom of your opposite shoulder blade? If you find it difficult, or at the opposite spectrum your hand easily slides far up your shoulder blade, that’s a problem.


A Disaster Overhead: Screening Overhead Movements

You are going to lift the weight. I know it. Your legs are strong, your technique is getting dialed in, and that weight is going over your head.   Standing the weight up however is a different story. Your shoulders round in, you take five steps to stabilize the bar overhead, and then wonder why your shoulders hurt the next day after snatching.   The overhead position is the hardest position for modern day humans to master. You spend too much time in your car and at a computer to walk into the gym and undo the poor posture you have been practicing all day.   The scapula is the big player in overhead shoulder health. The shoulder must have the proper mobility and stability to upwardly rotate just enough to stabilize the shoulder overhead. The traps are there to support the scapula by providing strength and stability to the shoulder overhead.   As the arm flexes overhead, any mobility restrictions in the lat will limit the shoulder from its full range of motion. When the shoulder stops short, the connective tissue in the rotator cuff bears the brunt of the load. In the short-term, your body will allow you to keep training. Over time, the connective tissues will not be able to handle the load and volume leading to inflammation and injury.

Overhead Movement Exercise

DO THIS: Strict press a barbell (45#/35#) for 5 reps each with a 5 second descent. Are you pain free? The way your shoulder performs is based on the position of your spine. Your midline musculature ensures the shoulder and scapula are set up for success.

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Overhead Self-Assessment

To see if your shoulders are functional enough to perform overhead movements consistently over time, try this self-assessment: Can you reach up and touch the top of your opposite shoulder blade with the hand? (No bending, scrunching the shoulders, extending the low back or wiggling your way to into position.) If you find it difficult, or at the opposite spectrum your hand easily slides well past your shoulder blade, that’s a problem.


Shhhhh, It’s Not Actually Your Shoulder

Behind every pain free lift is a strong core built through quality breathing. Core stability is the centerpiece of shoulder health. Whether the shoulder is in flexion or extension, a solid core provides the foundation for quality movement. The more stability you create in your core, the more your brain recognizes safety to the spine, creating increased mobility to the surrounding tissues and joints. The core I am talking about is not your sweet six pack. Your deep core consists of the diaphragm, multifidus, intercostals, pelvic floor, and transverse abdominus. Lumped together, we call them “The Core of the Core.” Individually, they have a specific role for strengthening and stabilizing the joints and connective tissues supporting the spine. There is no amount of sit ups you can do to train these deep core muscles. The only way to get in there is through diaphragmatic breathing protocols that expand the rib cage and decompress the spine. The tissues of the pelvis, thoracic, neck, and shoulder will also benefit from diaphragmatic breathing protocols. The breath decreases recovery time, stress, and allows the tissues to work more efficiently.

Breathing Exercise

DO THIS: Start laying on your back and take a deep breath in through your nose expanding your abdomen, and then your chest, with air. Breathe in for 5 seconds. At the top hold your breath for 5 seconds and slowly exhale, through pursed lips, for 5 seconds. As you exhale, create tension in your abdomen. With each continuous breath, maintain the tension in your core as you inhale and exhale. Do not let your spine change position as you breathe.

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What to Do? Start with a Morning Routine for Shoulder Pain

Getting from pain to performance takes action. That action however does not need to be life altering. It needs to be consistent and provide all the components to helping your shoulder heal (not just the joint itself). Breathing, moving, and stabilizing are free and you do not need a doctor or trainer to prescribe them. We know you love training and our goal is to get you healthy as soon as possible.

To get you on your path to health, we have designed a morning movement routine specific to shoulder health. Inside you will find breathwork, mobility, and stability drills to eliminate the unhealthy mechanics of your shoulder and spine. Simply put, if you have shoulder pain, this is exactly what you need to do every single morning to be pain free.

Even better, it is all free. Click here to gain instant access.

Thanks for reading!

Anders


Resources:

1 jblack03. Evaluation of the Weak Shoulder. UW Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Seattle. Published August 13, 2015. Accessed February 14, 2018.

Kibler WB, Press J, Sciascia A. The Role of Core Stability in Athletic Function. SpringerLink. Published November 27, 2012. Accessed February 14, 2018.

3 Hazar Z, Ulug N, Yuksel I. Is There a Relation Between Shoulder Dysfunction and Core Instability?Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014;2(11_suppl3). doi:10.1177/2325967114s00173.

4 Disorders of the Scapula and Their Role in Shoulder Injury. Google Books. Accessed February 14, 2018.

The post The Shoulder Fix: Eliminating Shoulder Pain in the Strength Athlete appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Holistic Lifestyle Coaching w/ Paul Chek — 301

Paul Chek is an internationally-renowned expert in the fields of corrective and high-performance exercise kinesiology. For over 20 years, Chek’s unique, holistic health approach to treatment and education has transformed the lives of countless men and women through programs like the P~P~S Success Mastery Coaching Program.

Chek is licensed as a Holistic Health Practitioner (California) and is a Certified Neuromuscular Therapist and Clinical Exercise Specialist (ACE). He has also accrued three US patents for posture calibrating, hydrotherapy and equipment inventions, and has also designed several pieces of functional exercise equipment.

In 1995, Chek founded the C.H.E.K Institute (Corrective Holistic Exercise Kinesiology) to accommodate an ever-growing clientele and to train and certify future CHEK Practitioners. Not surprisingly, Chek is sought after as an international presenter and consultant for successful organizations like the Chicago Bulls, Australia’s Canberra Raiders, and the U.S. Air Force Academy. He has produced more than 50 videos, 6 books, and 16 advanced-level home study courses while regularly contributing to several publications and web sites, such as Mercola.com and Personal Training on the Net.

In this episode, we learn about Chek’s life and training philosophies, the last 4 doctors you’ll ever need, working in vs. working out, the 7 primary movements, and much more. Enjoy!


Interconnected Human Systems

Paul Chek is a systems man, who thinks of the body as a spider web, where everything is interconnected. Even though he didn’t graduate from high school, he taught himself a lot of complicated subjects, and had studied how human body systems work and affect others.

Over the years, Chek conducted a lot of what he calls “situational research” and realized all sorts of issues lead back to food, water, sleep, relationships, and over-exercising. He had identified common root causes for people’s problems and came up with a few ideas and philosophies: The Last 4 Doctors You’ll Ever Need, life’s 4 cycles, humans’ 7 primary movements, how we can connect to our deep true selves, and much more.

“A man is not really a man if he cannot connect to his feminine side.” — Paul Chek


Key Takeaways

  • Most of us are disconnected from the earth — Most people live in their head, constantly looking at computer, phone, and TV screens. We’ve developed a culture that prides itself on stating facts, figures, and memorization.
  • Knowledge is just a collection of ideas and wisdom is the synthesis of the practice of those ideas —The majority of people on earth think they’re doing the right things, such as using certain supplements, but a lot of the time we spend so much time trading and using information, which gets us disconnected from our roots and our bodies, leading to wrong decision making.
  • If you have seen many doctors to fix your pain and it still hasn’t gone away, you are probably just treating symptoms rather than the problem — Mike got the most effective changes in his posture and mobility from body work, decompressing his organs and releasing emotional tension. Our trapped emotions lead to blockages, which make us sick.
  • When something is happening in your life which is unwanted, examine what’s going on in your life unconsciously — Don’t do things because you need to, else because you choose to.
  • Training out of insecurities vs. willingness to explore their potential There will always be someone faster, stronger, or better than you, and it’s important to train out exploration of self-potential rather than winning only. That’s how you can live a healthy and happy life.
  • Working-in vs. working-out — Working-in is when you do an activity at low enough intensity and timed with breathing to harmonize your biological oscillators, which is your brain, heart, and solar plexus (gut). When you work-in, you generate more energy through breathing and movement than it costs to exercise, which means you create a surplus of energy. Working-out is when you spend more energy and resources than exercises returns, which is why you need to recover.
  • Compensating for low self-esteem — Men usually use athletics and power to compensate low sense of self-worth, whereas women use beauty.
  • If we aren’t connected to the depth of ourselves and our interest isn’t towards exploring ourselves for what we can be, then we get lost in needing to achieve stuff to get other people’s approval, recognition and love — It’s hard for people to grasp their heads around it, but lacking self-love and receiving only external sources of love halts our spiritual development. We can get stuck spiritually like children, who need mommy and daddy’s (or friends) approval to do stuff.
  • Humans’ 7 primary movement patterns — Squatting, lunging, bending, pushing, pulling, twisting and gait.

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Paul Chek’s Books

How to Eat, Move, and Be Healthy!


Movement That Matters


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com


Movement-RX

If you have low back, knee, or shoulder pain, check out Movement-Rx. Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner will get you healthy and strong.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post Holistic Lifestyle Coaching w/ Paul Chek — 301 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Building Movement Capacity w/ Dr. Roop Sihota — 300

Dr. Roop Sihota is a PT, a coach, and a movement enthusiast. He has been a long time team member and coach at MobilityWOD and San Francisco Crossfit, and recently launched a new movement project called ORIGINS.

Dr. Sihota is inspired by movement and is focused on the exploration of movement. He also loves working with movers from around the world. He started ORIGINS because of his passion to give back and provide educational content to help people make more complete decisions.

This is Roop’s second time on the show, check out the previous episode he was on to talk about Why Your Mobility Isn’t Improving — Dr. Roop Sihota — 173.

In this episode, we dive into why there is no such thing as bad movement, how to make more well rounded decision, why you should incorporate more play in your life, top inflammatory foods, and more. Enjoy!

Special bonus: Tune in to the very beginning of the video podcast on YouTube to watch Dr. Roop Sihota demonstrating 4 minutes of movements from ORIGINS.


ORIGINS — A Human Movement Project

Dr. Roop Sihota has travelled the world teaching people how to move and how to fix their movement issues. He used to think he had answers for everybody’s movement issues, but proved himself wrong. After noticing his solutions only worked for some clients, Dr. Sihota went through a transformation.

For the past few years, Dr. Sihota played the student role. He researched and explored many movement practices, and attended various movement seminars worldwide to figure out his gaps.

Dr. Sihota also got inspired by the book Essentialism: The Art of Less, which is focused on finding what is it that you do really well, what is it that you enjoy doing, and what is it that you can make the biggest impact. Every time he read those phrases he came back to the same conclusion (that he needs to work on): Artistic creative movement as a means to building a healthy body. And it needs to be given to people in a free source manner.

Dr. Sihota wanted to give back to the community and help people figure out how to live a healthier life with less pain, which is why he created ORIGINS — A Human Movement Project.

ORIGINS is about introducing people to simple small movements that they can incorporate into their workouts. It’s an educational platform that provides weekly 10–15 min movement pieces that can be incorporated at the beginning of workouts, at the end of workouts, or as your warmup. ORIGINS is meant to help people get a much better understanding of movement across the board and make more well-rounded decisions.


Key Takeaways

  • There is no such things as bad movement — Your body should be able to move well in many directions. When you are only moving it a certain way, again and again, and not opening your horizons to other movements, you will wear down your tissues. But if you are addressing your movement limitations, you will see improvements.
  • It’s all about your goals — Dr. Sihota is focused on his clients goals, that’s what it’s about. It’s about making people happy and excited to train.
  • Neurologically challenging movements — Dr. Sihota suggests mixing unique movements to your warmups. Ones that challenge you neurologically and are applicable to real life situations. He specifically likes movement flows, so you can get the body challenged before your system can get adapted.
  • Incorporate more play in your life — Adults play is almost non-existent today. Both Dr. Sihota and Mike recommend incorporating more play in your life, whether it’s during workouts, in your backyard, or on the dance floor. Play improves coordination, reaction time, and overall happiness. ORIGINS has many playful elements in it’s programming, look out in the next few weeks for tabata style tag games, walking on PVC pipes, and more.

We want the body to always be thinking rather than sleeping, except for when we want it to sleep.” — Dr. Roop Sihota

  • Functional Medicine — Once Dr. Sihota became a father a couple of years ago, he put more emphasis on leading a healthy lifestyle, both nutrition and movement wise. Dr. Sihota played with the idea of becoming certified in Functional Medicine, but first he became the patient himself. After getting comprehensive testing, including various blood tests, urine and stool tests, genetics test, etc. Even though Dr. Sihota was very conscious about his health, eating 90% healthy foods, moving often, etc. He discovered he had low testosterone, low vitamin D, high cellular oxidation levels, and more issue.
  • Top 7 inflammatory foods — As part of trying to figure out what causes his health markers to look bad, Dr. Sihota took out the top 7 inflammatory foods out of his diet: sugar, corn, soy, peanuts, dairy, eggs, and gluten.
  • Supplementation — Dr. Sihota is taking a dozen supplements a day to get his health marker stabilized. He’s trying to figure out which would be short-term vs long-term. His supplements include collagen protein, fish oil, vitamin D/K2, ashwagandha (an adaptogen that helps with organ function and is in Organifi Green Juice), zinc, and probiotics.
  • Low testosterone — Can be caused from a variety of issues: Low vitamin D, a leaky gut, and more. It’s important to have a holistic view and figure out your underlying issues before treating something.
  • Plant based painkillers — After getting his wisdom teeth extracted, Mike recovered from pain mostly using cannabis and kratom. His favorite cannabis products are made by a company called Jambo Superfoods.

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Connect with Dr. Roop Sihota

Connect on social: Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, Gmail

Resources: ORIGINS


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com

 


Movement-RX

If you have low back, knee, or shoulder pain, check out Movement-Rx. Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner will get you healthy and strong.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post Building Movement Capacity w/ Dr. Roop Sihota — 300 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

The Shoulder Fix w/ Dr. Theresa Larson and Andres Varner — 299

Dr. Theresa Larson is co-creator of The Low Back Fix, The Knee Fix, and The Shoulder Fix, and founder of Movement Rx, a physical therapy and wellness company that offers support to wounded warriors and individuals with health and movement issues. She travels all over the world as a speaker for MobilityWOD and the CrossFit Movement & Mobility Trainer Course. She is a lululemon ambassador, and works with nonprofits including Team Red White & Blue, LinderKids.org, Resiliency Project, CrossRoads Adaptive Athlete Alliance, and the National Eating Disorder Association.

Anders Varner is the co-creator of The Low Back Fix, The Knee Fix, and The Shoulder Fix, and owner of Anders Varner Training located in San Diego, CA. Anders found the weight room at 13 and decided he would call it home for the rest of his life. A four- time CrossFit regional competitor and member of John Cena’s “One Ton Club,” Anders has trained with and coached high level athletes from the worlds of the NFL, WWE, and CrossFit. A true believer in self discovery, Anders finds his true passion in helping the everyday person live a pain free, empowered life through mindful movement. Anders Varner’s approach has helped transform the lives of stroke victims, pre and postpartum moms, extreme weight loss clientele, and individuals recovering from drug and alcohol addiction.

Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner were recently on the show to talk about the Knee Fix (Episode 292) and The Low Back Fix (Episode 240).

In this episode, we dive into common patterns that create shoulder pain and problems, and give you techniques on how to fix the shoulder. We cover forward head posture, simple body position fixes for more awareness, how to self-assess your breathing muscles, breathing and emotions, and more. Enjoy!


The Shoulder Fix

Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner have come up with systemic ways to troubleshoot and fix our shoulders. They created The Shoulder Fix, an education platform that gets rid of the doctor’s curtain by empowering people to conduct self-assessment, and providing programs that can help solve 89% of shoulder problems! 

After identifying commons patterns with their own clients, Dr. Larson and Varner decided to share their knowledge and help more than one person at a time. Their personalized programs are focused on slowing you down first to build better patterns, bring awareness, and get stronger for your next workout or your next athletic performance. You will learn techniques, eliminate asymmetries, change behavior patterns to be more present in workouts, and get back from pain to performance mindfully.


Key Takeaways

  • Forward head posture — Most of us walk around with our heads forward, which puts us in bad positions, gets us stiff, and makes us weaker. A slight head forward is 15 degrees, which translates into 15 lbs of pressure going into your upper and lower spine. Over time, whether we’re on the computer or texting on our phones, we tend to go into 60 degree forward angles, which equal 60 lbs of pressure!
  • Pomodoro technique —You need to use full range of motion movements throughout the day, not just at the gym. The Pomodoro technique is used to ease pressure that builds from our office setting, being stuck next to a desk. The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks (usually 5 minutes).
  • Simple body position fixes for more awareness — Tuck your chin, shrug your shoulder back and down, and hang out in a squat more often. For example: Text or browse Instagram while you’re in a squat.
  • Breathing shallow dangers—One of the common patterns Dr. Larson and Varner identified for shoulder pain was bad breathing mechanics. When you breathe from your chest only, it makes you stiff and limits your range of motion over time. Then, if you work out in limited positions, you’re putting pressure on the body in bad angles, which is how you hurt yourself.
  • Self-assessing your breathing muscles — You should be able to initiate breath from your diaphragm, which sits right underneath your rib cage. Stand up tall and feel your ribs, check if any are flaring out. If any of your ribs are sticking out at all, then your diaphragm is not aligned well with your pelvic floor. That means you get less oxygen in your body, less work capacity, less power, and you probably can’t compress your spine. You should be able to easily breathe in from your belly into your chest, and exhale from your chest back to your belly.
  • Breathing and emotions — Breathing better and being in better positions go hand in hand, and both positively impact your emotions. Weak positions create stress and lead to lack of confidence, sadness, and other undesired emotions. Power positions, where your body parts are aligned well, let oxygen flow more easily, make the body stronger, and make you feel light, calm, centered, and more joyful.
  • Healthy scapula muscles prevent injuries — It’s important to learn how to engage your scapula muscles correctly before loading them. For example: the teres major muscles, like the lats, are big movers. But once these muscles are tired from working out, they are not working properly, create bad patterns, and create damage.
    • Note: If you don’t know how to engage your lats properly, you probably shouldn’t do kipping pull-ups. You will just load your scapula muscles with a lot of pressure that it can’t handle. Even Mike after years of training and coaching was pulling unevenly, slightly favoring with his right side during kipping pull-ups, which created asymmetry and caused pain.
  • The difference between discomfort and pain — It takes a certain amount of body awareness and feel to be able to distinguish between discomfort and pain. When you reach a certain level you know when to push during a workout, when the body is uncomfortable. And also when to slow down if something isn’t moving correctly and creating harm.
  • Mindset could make all the difference — Beyond having awareness to your body, you need to have strong mindset. You need to be strong minded when you push through a workout to experience growth, and when you are in pain, you need to shift your focus from being in pain into ‘I’m fine. I will get over this.’ But do it mindfully.

“Movement is objective. Pain is not.” — Theresa Larson


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com

 


Connect with Dr. Theresa Larson

Connect on social: InstagramFacebook

Resources: Dr. Theresa Larson WebsiteThe Low Back FixKnee Fix

Book: Warrior: A Memoir


Connect with Anders Varner

Connect on social: InstagramFacebook

Resources: The Low Back FixKnee Fix

Book: The Performance Lifestyle: Nutrition: A How to Guide to Fuel Your Life for Performance


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

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Train smart,

Mike and Doug

The post The Shoulder Fix w/ Dr. Theresa Larson and Andres Varner — 299 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.