Month: March 2018

The Science of Lactic Acid, Ketones, and More w/ Dr. Eddie Jo — 306

Dr. Eddie Jo, PhD, CSCS*D, CISSN is Professor of Sport and Exercise Physiology Director of the Human Performance Research Lab at Cal Poly Pomona University in Southern California. With an advanced expertise in neuromuscular physiology, energy metabolism, and endocrinology, Dr. Jo has dedicated much of his research to innovating the science and application of training methodologies, nutritional programming, and dietary supplementation to achieve optimal health and performance.

Dr. Jo has become “instafamous” with the help of our friend, Dr. Andy Galpin, who shared Dr. Jo’s unique, easy-to-read, scientific infographics.

Dr. Jo is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and Sports Nutritionist and together with his extensive scientific background, he has helped many elite athletes achieve optimum performance by applying evidence-based training and nutrition programs as well as state-of-the-art physiological and performance testing.

In this episode, we look into why lactate is actually good for you, how pain is protecting you, the role of endogenous ketones, performance possibilities of exogenous ketones, and much more. Enjoy!


Lactate is actually good for you

There is a common belief in the health and fitness industry that lactate is bad for us. Dr. Eddie Jo points out the confusion between correlation and causation, asserting muscle fatigue isn’t caused by lactate accumulation. Lactate doesn’t stay in our bodies, else gets emitted. It doesn’t cause us to fatigue or get that burning sensation.

Lactate is actually good for you, it’s a fuel source for ATP production, which fuel muscles and other tissues. It’s something we naturally produce especially during high muscle exercises, which gets recycled to form more glucose in the liver. Also, lactate and lactic acid are not one and the same.


 

Key Takeaways

  • An Acidic environment is stressful to cells — During high muscle activity, such as, sprinting, crossfit, or HIIT, we break ATP really fast, which creates too many protons in our bodies. When we go hard physically, we create a metabolically stressful environment, which lowers our PH levels and creates an acidic environment ,which is stressful to cells.
  • Pain and fatigue are the body’s protective mechanisms — When you feel fatigued or have that burning sensation from pain, it’s your body signaling you to slow, so you don’t create too much acidity in your body.
  • Endogenous ketones role — There are no natural ways to get exogenous ketones through regular food, it’s mostly produced endogenously, especially in the liver. Your body naturally produces ketones when you are carb depleted. It needs to maintain certain glucose levels, so when you don’t have enough, it oxidizes fat, which produced ketones as our brains can’t process fats, else only utilize glucose or ketones.
  • The ketogenic diet was created because ketones are better for the brain than glucose — Exogenous ketones, like all other supplements, are about providing more support for ATP production. Even though some of the ketogenic diet has been misapplied and misunderstood, it really makes a difference for the brain, and is specifically beneficial for people with seizures.
  • If you are carb main diet and take exogenous ketones, it may increase your performance —While there’s not a lot of research on it, there is enough comprehensive research to get people thinking about the potential benefits of adding ketones to a balanced, high carb diet. When we introduce an alternative fuel source to the body, it can help preserve muscle glycogen, which could translate into raw increase in capacity. Exogenous ketones could positively affect muscle physiology, muscle bioenergetics, and both physical and cognitive performance.
  • Meta Analysis — Is a good way to see what the research says, as it’s a secondary analysis on data that has already been published.
  • Research is not everything, it’s about how you feel — Dr. Jo asserts that as consumers we have to be open minded. Research is very helpful in figuring out how we should treat ourselves, but it’s not everything. It’s 2018, which means we still don’t have much research on a lot of things. If you experiment with a supplement or routine that makes you feel good, is not harmful, but doesn’t have much research on it, go for it!

“Placebo effects are a real thing… As long is it feels good and it’s not harmful, go for it. Spend your money.” — Dr. Eddie Jo

 

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Connect with Dr. Eddie Jo

Connect on social: Instagram, Twitter

Resources: Dr. Eddie Jo, Human Performance Lab Cal Poly Pomona


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com


Movement-RX

If you have low back, knee, or shoulder pain, check out Movement-Rx. Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner will get you healthy and strong.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike, Doug and Anders

The post The Science of Lactic Acid, Ketones, and More w/ Dr. Eddie Jo — 306 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

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Earn The Day w/ Functional Mover Adam Von Rothfelder — 305

Adam Von Rothfelder is a Milwaukee, Wisconsin Native and a former professional MMA fighter currently living in Venice, California. He developed himself through family tragedy, learned primal movement from Ido Portal, sparred with Brock Lesnar, and was featured on NBC’s show Strong as one of America’s top 10 trainers.

Von Rothfelder currently coaches some of America’s top CEOs and corporate executives to sustain success in life by building physical strength through movement. When he’s not coaching clients he’s operating as the CEO of Strong Coffee Company, a new venture that allows him to connect the things he loves most: creativity, movement and motivation.

In this episode, we look into what it means to Earn the Day, why bodybuilding is the best entry point for most athletes, why eating carbs before bed is good for you, and much more. Enjoy!

Fun fact: Von Rothfelder became a good friend of Barbell Shrugged, has co-hosted previous episodes, and is co-hosting some future shows.


From a nurse to a MMA Fighter

Adam Von Rothfelder grew up surrounded by health, fitness, and love. His mother was a nurse who was always taking care of everyone and his family raised him on values of giving. When he was a teenanger, his parents adopted a paraplegic kid, who became his brother.Over the years, he also had foster siblings, hosted foreign exchange students, and had random pets.

Von Rothfelder’s two older sisters became nurses and he went to nursing school himself. When his older brother had alcohol problems, he dropped off school to join his brother’s construction business to help support him. He went onto a different path, started doing personal training on the side, and was going to become an electrician.t 22 years old, one week before his union electrical apprenticeship, his brother passed away from drug overdose.

After hearing an ad on the radio, he signed up to fight for the Milwaukee rumble, a local men and women amateur kickboxing competition. Von Rothfelder didn’t have fighting experience, but learned various martial arts as a kid. He did well in the competition, but didn’t win. The second year, he came back and cleaned the house, which led to offers to fight in MMA, which was at its infancy at the time.

In fighting, he trained at the Minnesota Martial Arts Academy with some massive dudes, including Brock Lesnar and Brett Rogers.


Earn The Day

At 28 years old, Von Rothfelder retired from fighting after his shoulder snapped. He realized he was living a life that he didn’t want to live and moved back to Milwaukee. He got more into fitness and built three gyms with the help of his father. Once his father passed away from cancer, life punched him in the face again, and he went onto another new path.

Von Rothfelder felt emotionally closed from years of fighting and figured out his fascia was holding trauma. He approached movement and the body from a whole new perspective and even started doing ballet to open up his heart.

When he realized tomorrow is not inevitable, he set his intentions on doing his best and working the hardest everyday. He set intentions to call and connect with people he appreciated, letting them know they are being thought about and are valuable. That’s how he came up with EARN The Day, which stands for Exercise, Activity, Recovery, and Nutrition.

Von Rothfelder connected with Rave Kelly, who got him more into nature and helped him increasing his movements and emotional capacities. He also went to Thailand to train with Ido Portal, whose movement practice opened up everything for him. He started connecting all of his martial arts, without being concerned about pushing more weight, else controlling his body on a higher level.

“You can’t just move past things, you gotta deal with them too.” — Adam Von Rothfelder

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Key Takeaways

  • Bodybuilding is the best entry point for 90% of people — Von Rothfelder did bodybuilding from age 12. He recommends beginner athletes to do isolated hypertrophy movements with lots of volume, switching volumes between 60–75% and dropping to 40% for deload weeks, playing with intensity, tempo and tensions. It’s a great way to increase muscle fibers, neural pathways, and get to understand the movements and what’s happening.
  • Eating for ADD — Von Rothfelder has ADD and gets high wired on a fasted state. To slow down, he makes sure to eat dense foods and uses marijuana on occasion.
  • Keto sport diet mindset — You get keto benefits and maintain muscle by eating carbs only around workouts (before and after) and before going to bed. You can eat more fats and lower carbs when you don’t have high intensity workouts and get into intermittent fasting to enjoy keto benefits.
  • Eating carbs before bed helps you sleep better — It’s good to eat carbs around 20–60 min before going to sleep as you will get an insulin spike and then crash. If you try to sleep in a fasted state, you will be restless.
  • Training with kaatsu bands — Kaatsu bands help pump blood into your muscles at a greater rate with less resistance, which means less impact on the joint. It helps fascia expand, allowing muscle to grow, and releases IGF 1.

“There’s age and then there’s training age… Biceps a day or triceps a day keeps the doctor away.” — Adam Von Rothfelder


Connect with Adam Von Rothfelder

Connect on social: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Strong Coffee Company Instagram

Resources: Strong Coffee Company, Earn The Day


Strong Coffee Company

Von Felder just launched a new company this week called Strong Coffee Company. You get a first look into his new coffee products: Vanilla Latte, Mocha Latte, and Caffe Latte. All products are 100% instant lattes made from cold brew powder (which means it has 70% lower acidity). It has L-Theanine, a special anti-anxiety formula, an anti inflammation formula, a hydration formula, and includes 15g of protein and 5g of fat.

Strong Coffee has a special technology that is microencapsulated energy, which means it’s time released, like adderall.

Special offer: Use promo code: BBS20 for 20% OFF!

“Just because you get out of bed doesn’t mean you’re AWAKE. Strong Coffee Company is here to elevate your hustle every damn day. Through strength, inspiration and progress we’re here to help you do something bold. It’s time to Wake the F** Up” — Adam Von Rothfelder


FLIGHT Weightlifting program

Adam Von Rothfelder did our FLIGHT Weightlifting program with kettlebells! He doesn’t like to work overhead with barbells because of his past shoulder injury. Can you do our FLIGHT program with kettlebells?

For a comprehensive 3-5 days per week program with a coach join FLIGHT WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM!

flight-weightlifting-banner-12-18-2017_v4


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com


Movement-RX

If you have low back, knee, or shoulder pain, check out Movement-Rx. Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner will get you healthy and strong.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike, Doug and Anders

The post Earn The Day w/ Functional Mover Adam Von Rothfelder — 305 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Ask Dr. T: Are My Tight Traps Ruining My Handstand Push Ups?

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“Dr. T,

Every time I attempt handstand pushups, my shoulder blade seems to feel like it is on fire. I have been doing CrossFit for over a year and the problem only seems to get worse. I have spent hours with the foam roller and lacrosse ball and it never seems to go away.

Recently, I started to notice that the pain was moving from my shoulder blade and into my traps, creeping into my neck. I think I have a pinched nerve but I have never been diagnosed.

I live a healthy life, eat well, and love being active but this shoulder pain stops me in my tracks and I am worried I am stuck with this forever.”

— Jeff (Santa Barbara)


Thank you, Jeff.

In assessing shoulder pain, the first thing you want to think about is above and below the shoulder joint. It is common to have pain in the shoulder blade even though the impingement is coming from somewhere else (like your traps).

The overhead position in the handstand push up is very difficult. Depending upon a multitude of lifestyle factors, tight traps or lats can lead to a loss in external rotation.

Additionally, any kipping movements will only amplify the pain. Adding power to dysfunctional movement patterns will only make the problem worse.

The traps connect the neck and the shoulder. They are attached to the spine so excess tension is going to recognized as a threat to the spine. Releasing impingements in the traps allows the shoulder to depress taking pressure off the neck and spine and allowing for pain free overhead movement.


YOUR MOVEMENT RX

Every morning, you owe yourself six minutes of proper breathing and movement repatterning. Practicing proper breathing patterns will eliminate stress from the tissues. Once the tissues have calmed down, these shoulder specific mobility and stability drills will make every movement for the remainder of your day a corrective exercise.

To gain instant access to The Shoulder Fix morning routine, click the link below.

Thanks for reading!

Anders

The post Ask Dr. T: Are My Tight Traps Ruining My Handstand Push Ups? appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Talking Competing, Coaching and Running a Gym w/ Ryan Fischer — 304

Ryan Fischer’s entire life has always been about fitness. At the age of 12 he was a world ranked BMX racer. In high-school he ran track, played lacrosse, and football. Then, he got into skeleton and bobsled, and even qualified for the US Olympic Team Trials for both sports.

Fischer is also a big time crossfitter, who finished top 5 in the CrossFit Regionals for the past 3 years. He went from being homeless, couch surfing, stealing food at Whole Foods, and a stint as a male stripper, to becoming owner of the most successful gym in Orange County, CrossFit Chalk. He also created Chalk Online, a groundbreaking corporate wellness program.

Fischer always had a belief that life would work itself out if he kept working hard on his passions. In this episode, we look into look how hard everything has to be if you’re going to dream big and try to be your best everyday. Enjoy!

Fun fact: Fischer used to train under co-host Anders Varner, who was a teacher and big inspiration to Fischer opening his own gym, CrossFit Chalk.

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Using sports to optimize performance

Ryan Fischer was continually knocked down in life, but always kept fighting. He was homeless for months, staying on a friend’s couch with only $200 in his pocket. He even stole food from Whole Foods and almost took a job as a male stripper to make money.

CrossFit also suspended Fischer for a year as a result of a heated argument when he got no repped at CrossFit Regionals. Fischer felt like he was doing clean reps and was on the way to the CrossFit Games, which was all he cared about at the time. He told a judge: “I’m gonna fucking kill you if you don’t start counting this reps.” And didn’t even sign the workout judging paper, which ended up as a big deal. Fischer’s reputation got hurt and he was banned from the CrossFit Games for one year.

A year or two later, Fischer felt like CrossFit was intentionally pulling a fast one on him. The guy who was supposed to conduct his drug test avoided meeting him, which ended up as getting a failed drug test for no reason.

Fortunately, Fischer’s hard work, strong mindset, and passion for health and fitness opened the right doors for him. He landed an opportunity to open his own gym and he’s now owner of the most successful gym in Orange County, CrossFit Chalk.

A post shared by Ryan Fischer (@ryanfisch) on

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Key Takeaways

  • When you coach, keep in mind it’s probably your client’s favorite part of the day — Even if you don’t own the gym, where you are coaching, act like you own that gym. When you work hard and bring your passion, people notice it and appreciate it. Eventually some doors will open for you good things will happen.
  • Want to build the best gym possible? Imagine that you have an unlimited budget from an investor, but you need to pay it back — Fischer’s investor gave him told him to think about the best gym he’d like to create, but keep told him to keep in mind he needs to pay back the investment over time. It helped him think big, but realistically. He created his dream gym, CrossFit Chalk, with a business model that makes sense financially.
  • Treat your gym like your favorite restaurant — Fischer wants his gym to be your his clients’ favorite restaurant. The experience to be on point all the time. Every time a client walks in, it needs to look good, it needs to be vibing, and the client should walk out feeling he had a blast.

“CrossFit Chalk is the cleanest place you’d walk into.” — Anders Varner

  • Gym financial stats — Fischer’s investors put $260K into CrossFit Chalk. The space is 5,500 sq ft total, with 3,500 sq ft training area, and rents for $10K per month. CrossFit Chalk charges members $199 per month, which is the price of the competition in town, but they offer a premium product. Thanks to Fischer’s hard work, CrossFit Chalk opened their doors getting 100 members fairly quickly, and now they have 330 members.
  • The good money in fitness is in the corporate space — Jason Khalipa, who owns NC Fit, which has 7 locations in the Bay Area, is known to make the most of his money from corporate gigs. Running a gym is very competitive and usually doesn’t end up making big bucks for gym owners.
  • Be picky about who you work with — Fischer is very picky about the people he works with. For the first 2 months running CrossFit Chalk, he taught all 10 classes from 5am to 745pm. He was very picky about choosing what coaches he wanted to work with, and it took about 4–5 months until he had enough coaches to help him out. Fischer is very strict with his coaches to carry his vision, but he also shows a lot of appreciation for their hard work.

“I’m going to do the same thing I’ve done my entire life, I’m going to stay calm and I’m gonna work my ass off. I know that being passionate and showing everybody how passionate I am will turn into something else.” — Ryan Fischer


Connect with Ryan Fischer

Connect on social: Instagram, Facebook, CrossFit Chalk Instagram

Resources: CrossFit Chalk, Real Chalk Podcast


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com


Movement-RX

If you have low back, knee, or shoulder pain, check out Movement-Rx. Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner will get you healthy and strong.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike, Doug and Anders

The post Talking Competing, Coaching and Running a Gym w/ Ryan Fischer — 304 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Ask Dr. T: Pull Ups are Creating Pain Under my Shoulder Blades?

“Dr. T,

I love CrossFit and I have recently taken my strict pull ups to kipping and I am learning the butterfly kip.

Everything is going well with my form and technique but I have developed chronic pain behind my shoulder blade.

I spend a lot of time stretching and rolling on a lacrosse ball but I cannot find the right spot to make the pain go away. I know that my form is getting better but the pain continues.

Is there a way to keep progressing these skills and eliminate the pain without stopping completely?”

 — Patti (Northampton, Ma)


Patti, it is time to learn about shoulder STABILITY.

To understand why you have shoulder pain working on your pull ups, you need to understand the differences between mobility and stability.

Mobility is the shoulders ability to move through a full range of motion. If you have tight muscle and connective tissue, getting your arm over your head will be limited by the length of that tissue. This is what you are working on with the lacrosse ball.

Stability is the joints’ ability to control movement throughout that range of motion.

Beginning the journey into kipping pull ups is an exciting time. You’re getting better, faster, and the changes happen fast. Sadly, there is often shoulder pain that can occur if you jump in too fast or with too much volume.

The kipping pull up relies heavily on shoulder stability. A stable shoulder allows the pulling motion to come from the lat versus the bicep. If you do not have that connectivity and you add power to the movement through your hips, you will not be able to engage the largest muscle in your back, your lats.

Shoulder pain is a symptom of the lack of stability you have in your shoulder. As you add power to the pull up, the connective tissue becomes the big mover vs. the muscle tissue leading to inflammation and pain.


YOUR MOVEMENT RX

All is not lost. Mastering stability in the shoulder is a simple process that you can practice every morning. This six-minute morning routine is designed to eliminate shoulder pain, create stability in the shoulder, and help you train pain free. Pain free kipping pullups are one, simple click away.

To gain instant access to The Shoulder Fix morning routine, click the link below.

Thanks for reading!

Anders

The post Ask Dr. T: Pull Ups are Creating Pain Under my Shoulder Blades? appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Optimizing Performance w/ Dr. Mike Israetel— 303

Dr. Mike Israetel is co-founder and Head Science Consultant at Renaissance Periodization, a company dedicated to providing competitive and non-competitive athletes with scientifically backed methods of improving performance and altering body composition. He has coached numerous powerlifters, weightlifters, bodybuilders, and other individuals in both diet and weight training, and has also been a consultant on sports nutrition to the U.S. Olympic Training Site in Johnson City, TN.

Dr. Israetel has a PhD in Sport Physiology and has taught Exercise and Sport Science. Exercise Science at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, and Exercise Physiology, Personal Training, and Advanced Programming for sports and fitness at the University of Central Missouri.

In this episode, we dive into why you shouldn’t be overly enthusiastic about your training program, maximum recoverable volume, what it takes to be a strength & conditioning coach, and much more. Enjoy!


Using sports to optimize performance

Dr. Mike Israetel is a well rounded health and fitness science guy focused on hypertrophy and nutrition. He is also a competitive powerlifter, bodybuilder, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu grappler, who used to hold a bunch of state, national, and world records in raw powerlifting back when everyone was in equipment.

Dr. Israetel developed strength, nutrition, and recovery systems to optimize performance. His #1 advice for athletes is to avoid being overly enthusiastic about their training program. Selecting a logical amount of training is more important than food, sleep, supplements, etc. Dr. Israetel suggests you determine your training volume by finding your maximum recoverable volume (MRV).

“Sports science, the application of sport to training, is really just turning a hobby into a systematic machine-like entity. Anything that has been mechanized, systematized, is unbelievable.” — Dr. Mike Israetel

A post shared by Mike Israetel (@rpdrmike) on

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Key Takeaways

  • Doing too much is what gets athletes hurt and not recover — It’s accepted in most sports and athletic settings that more is better, but that’s completely untrue. The #1 problem in athletic performance is overtraining. When you add too much training, you exceed your body’s ability to recover, decreasing your training potential. For example: Baseball has insane volume of competition leaving almost no room for recovery.
  • Maximum Recoverable Volume (MRV) — If you train harder than your body can recover from, you can forget about growing because your body won’t grow any muscle if it can’t recover on a regular basis. You can’t just add stuff to training, else need to be trading elements. The maximum recoverable volume (MRV) is a threshold to measure how athletes can maximize their training and athletic potential.
  • Nutrition for beginner athletes — Beginner athletes shouldn’t worry about maximizing nutrition potential so they avoid getting overwhelmed with training. It’s better to focus on eating plenty of protein and getting full with every meal, leaving it the details for down the road.

“I’m an engineer. You are a machine. Let’s optimize you.” — Dr. Mike Israetel

  • A personal trainer’s job is to push their clients — As a coach, ideally you educate your clients during “dead time” in training, a.k.a. between sets. When clients don’t care much about the science of training, it’s ok to make small talk instead. Just don’t get carried away with small talk, keep the big goal in mind, which is to get maximize your client’s training potential.
  • Want to be a top level Strength & Conditioning coach? You probably need a Master’s degree — Most undergraduate programs aren’t specific enough and are focused on Exercise Science. During Master’s degree is when you can actually learn about Strength & Conditioning and get an internship at the collegiate level, which is the best path to get into top level Strength & Conditioning coaching.
  • Want to be a Strength & Conditioning coach at a CrossFit community? You don’t need a Master’s degree — Higher education will be helpful to get a job at a CrossFit gym, but it’s not necessary. You can get deep into reading everything you can, incrementally getting into higher technical levels. Dr. Israetel suggests you start with the book he co-authored with Chad Wesley Smith, Scientific Principles of Strength Training. And on the practical side, do as much as you can experimenting on yourself and other clients.

Connect with Dr. Mike Israetel

Connect on social: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Renaissance Periodization Instagram

Resources: Renaissance Periodization


Doug Larson Fitness

Doug is working some new stuff! Sign up to get notified when he launches at DougLarsonFitness.com


The Bledsoe Show

The Bledsoe Show (Mike’s personal show) is back! Check out new episodes and the new website at TheBledsoeShow.com


Movement-RX

If you have low back, knee, or shoulder pain, check out Movement-Rx. Dr. Theresa Larson and Anders Varner will get you healthy and strong.


Watch the show


Subscribe to iTunes (iPhone) or Stitcher (android) for audio:


Check out our FREE 50+ page OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING GUIDE! Includes: The Basics, Sample Programming, Links to Technique Videos, and more!

flight-guide-banner-12-18-2017_v2

Train smart,

Mike, Doug and Anders

The post Optimizing Performance w/ Dr. Mike Israetel— 303 appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.

Ask Dr. T: Is My Tight Thoracic Spine Killing my Overhead Squat?

“Dr. T,

I have a desk job with a long commute. I know I do not have great posture, but I love working out and being active.

Recently, I have started to experience significant shoulder pain when I am overhead squatting. When I am standing with weight overhead there is no pain. It is usually on the descent when things start to get crazy. I can feel my shoulders internally rotate and that is when the pain kicks in.

I have done a ton of banded stretching, but I cannot seem to get my upper back to loosen up. I think my poor posture throughout the day makes it tough, but the work life is not always ideal.

Is there anything I can do to open up my thoracic spine and get my shoulders in less pain when I overhead squat?”

 — Michael (Virginia Beach)


Thank you, Michael.

You are not alone. Even I struggle with thoracic spine and upper back limitations. These issues are not limited to people with long commutes and desk jobs. I often find myself with a tight upper back after a long day of treating athletes.

The secret to mobilizing your thoracic spine lies in the breathing patterns you maintain throughout the day. Breathing into your chest creates a stress response in your nervous system and forces your body to hold on to additional stress.

You guessed it, that stress is stored in your upper back and traps making your shoulders tight.

Use these drills to bring your breath into your diaphragm, which will activate your deep core muscles, improve your posture, and develop a better shoulder position throughout the day. This will lead to a stronger overhead position throughout the entire overhead squatting range of motion.


Your Movement Rx

Your overhead squat will be better at night if you start your day with proper breathing and movement. Practicing proper breathing and shoulder specific mobility and stability drills will make every movement for the remainder of your day a healthy, corrective exercise.

To gain instant access to The Shoulder Fix morning routine, click the link below.

Thanks for reading!

Anders

The post Ask Dr. T: Is My Tight Thoracic Spine Killing my Overhead Squat? appeared first on Barbell Shrugged.